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2018 Five Year Capital Outlay Plan

This Plan has been developed and revised annually in accordance with the minimum criteria established by the State Budget Office and the Office of Facilities and was approved by the Delta College Board of Trustees on October 11, 2016.

The Plan includes capital priorities to support current programming efforts, anticipated programming changes, and the current capital base covering fiscal year 2018 through fiscal year 2022. It includes both self-funded projects and those in which State cost participation is requested.

Section I - Mission Statement

I. MISSION STATEMENT

The Mission Statement: Delta College serves our Great Lakes Bay Region by educating, enriching, and empowering our diverse community of learners to achieve their personal, professional, and academic goals.

The Vision Statement: Delta College is our communities’ first choice to learn, work, and grow.

Values: Delta College is a diverse learning-centered community based on integrity and respect.  From a foundation of leadership, we use innovation and teamwork to achieve excellence.

  • Diversity: We actively promote, advocate, respect and value differences. We foster a welcoming environment of openness and appreciation for all.
  • Integrity: We are committed to honesty, ethical conduct, and responsibility.
  • Respect: We stand for trust, caring, loyalty and academic freedom.
  • Excellence: We support outstanding achievement in our students, employees, and communities. We have a passion for quality and strive for continuous improvement.
  • Leadership: We create and communicate inspirational visions for results. We are accountable to our communities.
  • Innovation: We rejoice in creative change. We are flexible, agile, and risk-taking.
  • Teamwork: We foster communication and collaboration across boundaries, and support shared governance.
  • Learning-Centered Community: We are an engaging, inclusive, diverse learning organization. We focus on academic excellence, civic responsibility and community leadership.

Program Goals: The mission of Delta College is manifested through goals which include but are not limited to provision of high quality programs and services leading to:

  • Postsecondary associate degrees, certificates, and other credentials of educational
  • Lower division preparation for college and university transfer.
  • Occupational/workforce entry preparation.
  • Occupational upgrading and retraining.
  • General education.
  • Educational partnerships with business, industry, government, and other institutions.
  • Education for personal growth.
  • Support for student needs and informed choices in academic, personal, and career decisions.
  • Support for special student groups, e.g., handicapped, limited English speaking, gifted and talented, minorities and learning disabled.
  • Basic skill development and remediation.
  • Instructional resources and support to enhance teaching and learning.
  • Collaboration with secondary schools, other colleges and universities.
  • Enrichment of wellness (such as intellectual, physical, emotional, social, recreational, cultural, occupational, and spiritual well-being).
  • Development of community resources, community leadership and public service.

Operational Goals: Operational goals exist at Delta College to provide direction to the College as it manages its resources to implement program goals in an effective and efficient manner. The operational goals of Delta College are:

  • To maintain an effective organizational and governance structure which supports the College goals and fosters open communication between students, faculty, administration, staff and the Board of Trustees.
  • To provide the means for implementing systematic assessment, evaluation, and planning of College programs and services with high scholarly and professional standards.
  • To provide for professional and curricular response to technological, economic, and social change.
Section II - Instructional Programming

II. INSTRUCTIONAL PROGRAMMING

a) Describe existing academic programs and projected programming changes during the next 5 years, in so far as academic programs are affected by specific structural considerations (i.e., laboratories, classrooms, current and future distance learning initiatives, etc.):

Existing Academic Programs: Delta College offers Associate Degree and certificate level academic credentialing.  Delta College offers the following Associate degrees and Certificates:

Associate degrees: Delta College offers Associate degrees in Business Studies, Fine Arts, Applied Arts, and Applied Science in the following Career Education areas:

  • Accounting
  • Alternative Energy - Wind Turbine Technology
  • Architectural Technology
  • Art + Design
  • Associate in Arts
  • Associate in General Studies
  • Associate in Science
  • Automotive Service Educational Program (GM ASEP)
  • Automotive Service Technology
  • Automotive Service Technology/General Management
  • Chemical Process Technology
  • Chemical Technology
  • Child Development
  • Computer Science and Information Technology - Business Information Technology
  • Computer Science and Information Technology - IST Criminal Technology
  • Computer Science and Information Technology - IST Financial Security
  • Computer Science and Information Technology - IST Information Assurance
  • Computer Science and Information Technology - IT Support
  • Computer Science and Information Technology - Network Administration
  • Computer Science and Information Technology - Programming
  • Computer Science and Information Technology - Web
  • Construction Management
  • Cosmetology Management
  • Criminal Justice Corrections
  • Criminal Justice Law Enforcement
  • Criminal Justice Law Enforcement with Basic Police Training
  • Criminal Justice Security Loss Prevention Specialist
  • Dental Assisting
  • Dental Assisting/General Management
  • Dental Hygiene
  • Dental Hygiene/General Management
  • Diagnostic Medical Sonography
  • Diagnostic Medical Sonography/General Management
  • Electrical Utility Worker
  • Electronic Media Broadcasting (EMB)
  • Entrepreneurship Small Business Management
  • Environmental Technology
  • Fire Fighter Technician
  • Fire Investigation/Prevention
  • Fire Science Technology
  • Fire Science Technology Industrial Commercial Security and Safety
  • Fire Science Technology Leadership and Training
  • Fire Science/Emergency Medical Services
  • General Management
  • Global Peace Studies
  • Health Fitness Specialist
  • Health Fitness Specialist/General Management
  • Heavy Duty Diesel Service Technology
  • HVACR Service Technology
  • Industrial Technology Education
  • Journalism and Emerging Media
  • Legal Support Professional
  • Management \ Subsequent Degree
  • Management \ Subsequent Degree Northwood 3+1
  • Manufacturing and Industrial Technology
  • Marketing Management
  • Mechanical Engineering Technology
  • Mechatronics Technology
  • Medical Administrative Assistant
  • Nursing (ADN)
  • Nursing RN Transition Track - Licensed Paramedic to RN
  • Nursing RN Transition Track - Licensed Practical Nurse to RN
  • Nursing/General Management
  • Office Professions - Administrative Assistant
  • Office Services Management
  • Physical Therapist Assistant
  • Physical Therapist Assistant/General Management
  • Radiography
  • Radiography/General Management
  • Residential Construction
  • Respiratory Care
  • Respiratory Care/General Management
  • Retail Management
  • Skilled Trades
  • Skilled Trades Carpenter
  • Skilled Trades Electrician
  • Skilled Trades Jobbing Molder
  • Skilled Trades Machine Builder
  • Skilled Trades Machine Repair
  • Skilled Trades Millwright
  • Skilled Trades Pattern Maker
  • Skilled Trades Pipefitter (Industrial Maintenance)
  • Skilled Trades Plumber-Pipefitter
  • Skilled Trades Stationary Boiler Engineering
  • Skilled Trades Tinsmith
  • Skilled Trades Tool Die Maker
  • Skilled Trades Tool Hardener
  • Surgical Technology
  • Surgical Technology/General Management
  • Water Environment Technology
  • Welding Engineering Technology

Certificates:

  • Academic Career Experience Certificate of Achievement
  • Accounting Advanced Certificate
  • Automotive Service Technology Advanced Certificate
  • Chemical Process Technology Advanced Certificate
  • Chemical Technology Laboratory Science Advanced Certificate
  • Chemical Technology Pre-Medical Laboratory Science Advanced Certificate
  • Child Development - Educational Paraprofessional Certificate of Achievement
  • Child Development Advanced Certificate
  • Communication - Interpersonal Certificate of Achievement
  • Communication - Presentational Certificate of Achievement
  • Computer Aided Drafting Advanced Certificate
  • Computer Numerical Control Advanced Certificate
  • Computer Numerical Control Certificate of Achievement
  • Computer Science & Information Technology Business & Information Technology Advanced Certificate
  • Computer Science and Information Technology - IST Criminal Technology Post Associate Certificate
  • Computer Science and Information Technology - IST Financial Security Post Associate Certificate
  • Computer Science and Information Technology - IT Support Advanced Certificate
  • Computer Science and Information Technology - Network Administration Advanced Certificate
  • Computer Science and Information Technology - Web Advanced Certificate
  • Criminal Justice Corrections Certificate of Achievement
  • Criminal Justice Corrections with Jail Officer Academy Certificate of Achievement
  • Criminal Justice Law Enforcement with Basic Police Training Certificate of Achievement
  • Criminal Justice Security Loss Prevention Specialist Certificate of Achievement
  • Dental Assisting Advanced Certificate
  • Diagnostic Medical Sonography Advanced Certificate
  • Digital Film Production Advanced Certificate
  • Electrical Utility Substation Worker Advanced Certificate
  • Entrepreneurship Certificate of Achievement
  • Entrepreneurship Small Business Management Advanced Certificate
  • Environmental Technology Advanced Certificate
  • Fire & Industrial Loss Prevention Officer Advanced Certificate
  • General Writing Certificate of Achievement
  • Global Peace Studies Certificate of Achievement
  • Group Fitness Instructor Advanced Certificate
  • Health Foundations Advanced Certificate
  • Health Insurance Coding and Claim Specialist Advanced Certificate
  • HVACR Air Conditioning Advanced Certificate
  • HVACR Commercial Refrigeration Advanced Certificate
  • HVACR Heating Advanced Certificate
  • International Studies Advanced Certificate
  • Journalism and Emerging Media Advanced Certificate
  • Lean Quality Manufacturing Advanced Certificate
  • Lean Resource Management Certificate of Achievement
  • Legal Support Professional - Law Office Foundation Advanced Certificate
  • Legal Support Professional - Law Office Specialist Advanced Certificate
  • Liberal Arts Advanced Certificate
  • Mechatronics Technology Advanced Certificate
  • MIT Supervisor Certificate of Achievement
  • Office Professions - Office Assistant Advanced Certificate
  • Office Professions - Office Skills Core Certificate of Achievement
  • Office Professions - Office Specialist Advanced Certificate
  • Office Services Management Advanced Certificate
  • Personal Trainer Advanced Certificate
  • Practical Nurse Advanced Certificate
  • Professional Studies in Office Administration Certificate of Achievement
  • Quality Assurance Certificate of Achievement
  • Quality Management Certificate of Achievement
  • Residential Construction Advanced Certificate
  • Retail Management Advanced Certificate
  • Skilled Trades Agriculture Maintenance Advanced Certificate
  • Skilled Trades Carpenter Advanced Certificate
  • Skilled Trades Construction Certificate of Achievement
  • Skilled Trades Electrical Advanced Certificate
  • Skilled Trades Electrician Advanced Certificate
  • Skilled Trades Jobbing Molder Advanced Certificate
  • Skilled Trades Machine Builder Advanced Certificate
  • Skilled Trades Machine Repair Advanced Certificate
  • Skilled Trades Mechanical Advanced Certificate
  • Skilled Trades Mechatronics Technology Advanced Certificate
  • Skilled Trades Millwright Advanced Certificate
  • Skilled Trades Pattern Maker Advanced Certificate
  • Skilled Trades Pipefitter (Industrial Maintenance) Advanced Certificate
  • Skilled Trades Plumber-Pipefitter Advanced Certificate
  • Skilled Trades Stationary Boiler Engineering Advanced Certificate
  • Skilled Trades Tinsmith Advanced Certificate
  • Skilled Trades Tool Die Maker Advanced Certificate
  • Skilled Trades Tool Hardener Advanced Certificate
  • Surgical First Assistant Post Associate Certificate
  • Surgical Technology Advanced Certificate
  • Technical Writing Certificate of Achievement
  • Water Environment Technology Advanced Certificate
  • Welding Engineering Technology Advanced Certificate
  • Youth Services Advanced Certificate
  • Youth Services Certificate of Achievement

Transfer Programs: Students can enroll at Delta College in the following transfer programs that lead to a baccalaureate degree:

  • Associate of Arts (A.A.)
  • Associate of Science (A.S.)

Life-Long Learning (Short-Term Occupational Training Programs and Enrichment Activities): Delta College provides area residents with a variety of short-term occupational training and enrichment activities. Examples of the short-term occupational training opportunities include: Health Unit Coordinator, Phlebotomist, EKG Technician, Pharmacy Technician, Insurance Billing, Accounts Receivable Specialist, Medical Transcriptionist, Computer Skills and Human Resources, aPHR (associate professional in human resources).  Examples of the discipline types of continuing education offerings include: Nurse Refresher course, CPR/Basic Life support for healthcare professionals, ICD-10 Coding Course, Dental Local Anesthesia Administration, NEC Code Update for Electricians, plumbing license exam prep, electrical license exam prep, residential building pre-licensure, and Child Development CDA preparation.

Additional partnerships have been formed with the Bay Area, Saginaw and Midland Chamber of Commerce to provide a discount to online learning continuing education courses with 24/7 access. Over 2,000 training options are provided at a reduced price and include courses such as: accounting fundamentals, introduction to Microsoft excel and word, fundamentals of supervision and management, introduction to SQL, speed Spanish, and project management fundamentals.

LifeLong Learning is a sponsor of State Continuing Education Clock Hours (SCECHs). SCECHs are State approved credits that are used for the renewal of selected certificates issued by the Michigan Department of Education (MDE). SCECHs are the total number of instructional hours in a program. For example, five (5) hours of training equals five (5) SCECHs. SCECHs are a way to measure and record a permanent record of training and education experiences for individuals.

Existing/Current Distance Learning Instruction: Delta College offers distance learning instruction through a variety of options to students.  In addition to being a participating member of the Michigan Colleges Online (formerly known as the Michigan Community College Virtual Learning Collaborative), students can access distance learning through Internet delivered classes.  It should be noted that Delta College's primary focus on offering distance learning instruction is to provide alternative delivery systems to our students.  Students enrolling in distance education also enroll in face-to-face courses during the same semester.  In the Fall 2016 semester, 10.33% of students (943) enrolled in a distance learning course without enrolling in a traditional (face-to-face) course (this is an increase from 781 in Fall 2015).

Enrollment in distance delivered instruction has grown substantially in recent years in both course offerings and student enrollment.  In the Fall 2016 semester, 15,049 credit hours were generated by students enrolled in Internet courses.  Distance education courses are currently offered/available in the following disciplines: accounting, art, biology, computer systems technology, cooperative education, criminal justice, economics, education, English, entrepreneurship, environmental science, fire science, health science, history, humanities, literature, lifelong wellness, management, manufacturing and industrial technology, mathematics, nursing, office automation technology, pharmacology, philosophy, political science, psychology, radiography, sociology, Spanish and speech.

 In August 2002, Delta College received accreditation from the Higher Learning Commission - a Commission of the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools to offer an Associate of Arts degree via distance learning and all distance learning degrees offered through the Michigan Community College Virtual Learning Collaborative (MCCVLC).  The College received approval from the Higher Learning Commission to offer all Associate degrees via distance learning in April 2004 (with the exception of the Associate in Fine Arts degree).

Off-Campus Centers: Delta College offers a variety of academic courses at off-campus centers to increase Great Lakes Bay Region residents’ access to postsecondary education.  While the College offers instruction at several off-campus sites each semester in Bay, Midland, and Saginaw Counties, the College offers academic instruction at three main centers. The three major off-campus centers are the:

  1. Ricker Center in Buena Vista Township in Saginaw. Student enrollment at the Ricker Center has decreased, with 342 students enrolling during the Fall 2016 semester (down from 386 in Fall 2015).  A majority of students enrolling at the Ricker Center also enroll in classes on-campus, as only 50 of the students enrolling at the Ricker Center during the Fall 2016 semester did not enroll in a class on-campus.  During the Fall 2016 semester, a total of 31 courses were offered generating 1,452 credit hours.
  2. Delta College Midland Center in Midland.  Compared to the Fall 2015 semester, student enrollment at the Midland Center has decreased from 570 (Fall 2015) to 561 students enrolled during the Fall 2016 semester.  Only 106 students did not enroll in a class on-campus during the same semester.  During the Fall 2016 semester, a total of 35 courses were offered generating 2,290 credit hours.
  3. Delta College Planetarium and Learning Center in downtown Bay City.  This Center’s enrollment has decreased by 118 students as compared to the Fall 2015 semester.  During the Fall 2016 semester, 304 students enrolled in classes at the Planetarium (33 students did not enroll in courses on-campus during the semester).  During the Fall 2016 semester, 33 course sections were offered generating 1,175 credit hours.

The College also offers courses as part of an early college program at our Birch Run Center which is owned and operated by the Birch Run School District. 

In the past five years, the following programs have been developed to meet the needs of employers in the Great Lakes Bay Region:

  • Computer Numerical Control (Certificate)
  • Global Peace Studies
  • Health Foundations
  • Heavy Duty Diesel Service Technology
  • Mechatronics Technology
  • Surgical First Assistant

The following programs have undergone significant revisions:

  • Accounting
  • Art + Design
  • Automotive Service Technology
  • Dental Assisting
  • Entrepreneurship
  • Chemical Process Technology
  • Chemical Technology
  • Computer Applications
  • Computer Science and Information Technology – IST – Cyber Security
  • Computer Science and Information Technology – Network Administration
  • PC Systems Support and Technology
  • Computer Science and Information Technology - Web
  • Computer Science and Information Technology - Programming
  • Computer Science and Information Technology - Business and Information Technology
  • Manufacturing and Industrial Technology
  • Merchandising Management
  • Mechanical Engineering Technology
  • Office Services Management
  • Office Professions – Administrative Assistant
  • Office Professions - Office Assistant
  • Professional Studies in Office Administration
  • Legal Support Professional

In addition, the College is exploring and developing several new programs to meet the high wage, high skill, high demand occupations identified in the region. Examples of new programs under development include:

  • CNC – MAT2
  • Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)
  • Radio – EMB
  • Health Fitness – PT (dual degree)

In distance learning, Delta College is actively developing courses for Internet delivery and this delivery system has grown both in student enrollments and course offerings.  In 2002, Delta College prepared an institutional change of status for the Higher Learning Commission North Central Association to obtain accreditation to offer an Associate of Arts degree obtained 100% through distance learning delivery.  Approval to offer this degree was granted in August 2002.  The College received approval from the Higher Learning Commission in April 2004 to offer all Associate degrees through distance learning delivery (with the exception of the Associate in Fine Arts degree that was not submitted for consideration).

In addition, the College offers several Internet courses and Associate degrees in collaboration with the Michigan Colleges Online.

b) Identify the unique characteristics of each institution’s academic mission.  Two-year degree and certificated technical/vocational training, workforce development activities, adult education focus, continuing or lifelong educational programming, partnerships with intermediate school district(s), community activities; geographic service delivery area(s), articulation agreements or partnerships with 4-year institutions, etc.:

There are several programs, activities, services, and partnerships that are unique to Delta College. Examples of these unique characteristics include but are not limited to:

Academic/Instructional Programs: The College has several academic programs that are unique within Michigan:

  • Chemical Process Technology:  The Chemical Process Technology Program was developed in conjunction with the Dow Chemical Company, Dow Corning Corporation and Michigan Technological University.  The Program is designed to train individuals for employment as a process operator in the chemical/material processing industry.  Originally, the Chemical Process Technology Program was designed as a 2+2 aligned program with Michigan Technological University; a student completes their Associate’s degree at Delta College and transfers to MTU to complete a bachelor’s degree.  To meet regional workforce demands and student enrollment patterns, Delta College has also developed and implemented a Certificate program and a short-term accelerated (Fast Start) program.  Dual enrolled high school students also enroll in chemical process technology classes (usually in the 12th grade) to earn early college credits (up to 23 college credits).  Students enrolled in the Chemical Process Technology program have opportunities for related work experience during enrollment to further enhance their skill development.  The Dow Corning Corporation donated their Chemical Process Pilot Plant to Delta College and in-depth, equipment specific training is being conducted on the College’s main campus for students enrolled in the academic courses/programs and to retrain existing employees as of the Spring 2002 semester.  Based on significant employment needs identified by Dow Corning, Dow Chemical, and Hemlock Semiconductor, this program has undergone a significant expansion and program revision.  This program also supports solar companies who are locating in the Great Lakes Bay Region.
  •  Wind Turbine Technology Program: Delta College initiated an associate degree program to train individuals to become wind turbine technicians.  Classes began in the Fall 2009 semester to support the growing need for a trained workforce.   
  • Automotive Service Educational Program (ASEP):  Delta College is one of the first community colleges in the United States to offer the Automotive Service Educational Program.  This is an Associate degree automotive program conducted in partnership with General Motors Corporation dealerships to train automotive (dealership) technicians.  This is a two-year program, with 60 weeks spent in Delta College training facilities, and the remainder of time spent in a General Motors dealership.  Training in each specialized subject area is dealt with on a rotational basis in the College’s training facilities and is immediately followed by related work experience in the dealership.
  • Water Environment Technology:  Delta College is one of two community colleges in Michigan that offers an Associate’s degree in Water Environment Technology.  This program was developed in partnership with regional water and wastewater treatment plant facilities and local governments.  Upon successful completion of this program, students are eligible to apply for certification as a Wastewater Class "D” Operator.
  • Welding Engineering Technology:  Delta College offers one of the few Welding Engineering Technology Associate degree programs in the United States that is articulated with a baccalaureate institution.  This program combines specialized welding training with related technical skills, and is articulated in a 2+2 program with Ferris State University, Lake Superior State University, and Saginaw Valley State University.
  • Nursing Program:  To support the Regional Skills Alliance and increase the number of qualified Nursing faculty, Delta College has partnered with Saginaw Valley State University, four area hospitals, and two community colleges to implement a Nurse Practice Scholars Program.  This program provides RNs employed by area hospitals with paid release time to obtain up to 32 Master’s Degree credits in Nursing at SVSU, preceptor experience, and instructional experience as an adjunct faculty at Delta College. Upon the two-year program completion, RNs will have the knowledge and experience to qualify for Nursing faculty positions.  Delta College also expanded its Nursing Program to enroll an additional 20 students.

Corporate Services: Corporate Services is a division of Delta College and a recognized leader in developing, delivering and administering training solutions for employers.  From two hour training experiences to 13 week certificate programs, Delta College Corporate Services ensures employees are ready to meet business challenges.  Training is provided at the local business, around the globe, or on our campus located in the heart of the Great Lakes Bay Region.  Delta College’s award winning training programs help businesses achieve their strategic goals.  Training is provided in key industries including manufacturing, health care, government and education, business and energy.

Corporate Services has provided customized training to over 800 companies in the College’s district, Michigan, 44 states and 65 countries.  Corporate Services provides training to approximately 10,000 individuals annually through multiple delivery systems including classroom, computer-based, and distance education.  Corporate Services customizes training to meet the needs of each client.  Examples of Corporate Services training include:

  • Technical Training: chemical process operations, solar manufacturing, advanced manufacturing, diesel technician, environmental health and safety, journeyman upgrade, CNC programming/operations, robotics, quality systems, GD&T, hydraulics, pneumatics, welding, statistical process control, failure mode effect analysis, six sigma, lean, and design of experiments.
  • Organizational Development: communication, strategic planning, team leadership and effectiveness, service mindset, inspirational leadership, problem solving, time & priority management, employee skills building, conflict resolution, and lean resource management.
  • elearning and Blended Learning: Custom built training solutions for businesses include creation of online training modules accessible on the business LMS or Delta’s. Includes computer based training, project management, instructor-led training, graphically enhanced teleconferencing, web-based training.
  • Training Administrative Services: course and facilitator scheduling, training center management and training support resources.
  • Performance Consulting: provides workforce analysis to determine benchmarks needed for greater performance. Closes the gaps between workforce, workplace and the work needed to keep the business running smoothly. Includes: strategic planning, competency modeling, neutral facilitation, talent and performance management, and succession planning.
  • Non-Traditional Funding for Training: As an innovator in expanding corporate training, Delta College has partnered with a variety of organizations to provide the resources needed for area businesses.  Delta College received funding from the Michigan Small Business Development Center and the US Small Business Administration to operate a Michigan Small Business Development Center.  Center staff provide support for entrepreneurs and small businesses in Arenac, Bay, Midland and Saginaw counties with a focus on confidential consulting, business consultation, market research, and technology commercialization. Center staff provide assistance to nearly 300 small businesses in the region annually. Since locating at Delta College in 2003, the Great Lakes Bay Region SBDC has served over 4,134 clients, 435 new business starts and aided in $106 million in capital formation.

Public Broadcasting (PBS): Delta College is one of four community colleges in the nation that operates Public Broadcasting.  WDCQ (channel 19), has been serving the area since 1964 and WDCP (channel 35) located in the Thumb region began broadcasting in 1986 to expand coverage to a 14 county region in mid-Michigan.  In 1989, services were further expanded with the addition of public radio, Q-90.1 which is a shared operation with Central Michigan University.  Delta College’s Quality Public Broadcasting provides the region with local, state, and national programming and is involved in the College’s Associate degree instruction in Electronic Media/Broadcasting.

Delta College Planetarium and Learning Center: Located in downtown Bay City, this Center provides Delta College students and the community with unique programming.  The facility was funded by NASA, and as a result, a variety of related activities and partnerships have occurred.  The planetarium offers a variety of shows to secondary school students and the public, and this facility has provided the College with the opportunity to provide astronomy and other related courses using state-of-the-art equipment and technology.

National League of Innovation: Delta College is a charter member of the National League for Innovation in the Community College.  The League is comprised of 19 college districts and their respective campuses.  Delta College’s membership in the League is recognition that the College is dedicated to the improvement of learning through experimentation and innovation.

Linkages With Michigan Works!: Delta College actively participates with external organizations in Bay, Midland, and Saginaw Counties to provide activities and programs through the efficient coordination of resources.  Delta College participates actively in the local One-Stop Centers operated by the Great Lakes Bay Michigan Works!, and currently provides Employment Services, and Trade Adjustment Act (TAA) services in these Centers.  The College participates in Workforce Investment and Opportunity Act activities including the Educational Advisory Group (EAG), strategic and environmental scanning processes, and provides occupational training through Individual Training Accounts (ITAs), Trade Adjustment Act (TAA) funding and Fast Start training programs.

Course Articulation and Program Alignment with K-12 School Districts, Intermediate School Districts, and Career/Skill/Technology Centers: Delta College has been actively involved in course articulation and program alignment activities for several years.  As of September 1, 2016, the College has 137 new and renewed 2+2 program articulation/alignment agreements with 30 K-12 partners.  During the 2015-16 academic year, 921 students articulated 2695 courses and 6096 academic credits.

Articulation Agreements have been signed with the following K-12 school districts:

  • Alma School District
  • Bay-Arenac Intermediate School District
  • Bay City Public Schools
  • Bullock Creek School District
  • Chesaning School District
  • Clare-Gladwin RESD
  • Downriver Career Technical Consortium
  • Essexville-Garber School District
  • Freeland School District
  • Hemlock School District
  • Huron Intermediate School District
  • Iosco Intermediate School District
  • Lapeer Intermediate School District
  • Meridian Public Schools
  • Merrill School District
  • Midland Public School District
  • Mt. Pleasant Intermediate School District
  • Ogemaw Heights School District
  • Owosso School District
  • Pinconning School District
  • Saginaw Township School District
  • Sanilac ISD
  • School District of the City of Saginaw
  • Shiawassee RESD
  • St. Louis School District
  • Swan Valley School District
  • Tuscola Intermediate School District

MACRAO Articulation Agreements with Michigan Four-Year Colleges and Universities: Delta College is a participant in the MACRAO Agreement with the following four-year institutions:

  • Adrian College
  • Albion College
  • Baker College
  • Calvin College
  • Central Michigan University
  • Cleary University
  • Concordia University
  • Davenport University
  • Eastern Michigan University
  • Ferris State University
  • Finlandia University
  • Grand Valley State University
  • Lake Superior State University
  • Lawrence Technical University
  • Madonna University
  • Marygrove University
  • Michigan State University
  • Michigan Technological University
  • Northern Michigan University
  • Northwood University
  • Oakland University
  • Olivet College
  • Rochester College
  • Saginaw Valley State University
  • Saint Mary's College
  • Siena Heights University
  • Spring Arbor University
  • Western Michigan University

Michigan Transfer Agreements with Michigan Four-Year Colleges and Universities: Delta College is a participant in the Michigan Transfer Agreement, which will be replacing the MACRAO Agreement with the following four-year institutions:

  • Albion College
  • Aquinas College
  • Baker College
  • Central Michigan University
  • Cleary University
  • College for Creative Studies
  • Cornerstone University
  • Davenport University
  • Eastern Michigan University
  • Ferris State University
  • Grand Valley State University
  • Kuyper College
  • Lake Superior State University
  • Lawrence Technological University
  • Madonna University
  • Michigan State University
  • Michigan Technological University
  • Northern Michigan University
  • Northwood University
  • Oakland University
  • Olivet College
  • Sacred Heart Major Seminary
  • Saginaw Chippewa Tribal College
  • Saginaw Valley State University
  • Siena Heights University
  • Spring Arbor University
  • University of Detroit Mercy
  • University of Michigan - Ann Arbor
  • University of Michigan - Dearborn
  • University of Michigan - Flint
  • Walsh College
  • Wayne State University
  • Western Michigan University

University Transfer Programs/Agreements: Delta College has signed articulation agreements with the following four-year institutions:

  • Biology - Alma College
  • Business Administration - Central Michigan University, Eastern Michigan University, Ferris State University, Kettering University, Northwood University, Siena Heights University, University of Michigan - Flint
  • Chemistry - Central Michigan University, Kettering University
  • Chiropractic - Palmer College of Chiropractic
  • Computer Science - Franklin University, Kettering University
  • Economics - Northwood University
  • Elementary Education - Central Michigan University, Ferris State University, Saginaw Valley State University
  • Engineering - Central Michigan University, Kettering University, University Detroit Mercy
  • Environmental Science - Alma College
  • Health Care Administration - Alma College
  • Integrated Leadership Studies - Central Michigan University
  • Journalism - Central Michigan University
  • Liberal Arts - University Detroit Mercy
  • Mathematics - Kettering University
  • Meteorology - Central Michigan University
  • Psychology - Central Michigan University
  • Physical Therapy - University of Michigan - Flint
  • Political Science - Central Michigan University
  • Radiation Therapy - University of Michigan - Flint
  • Secondary Education - Central Michigan University

Career Education Articulations/Transfer Agreements With Four-Year Colleges/Universities: Delta College has signed Career Education program articulation/transfer agreements with the following four-year institutions:

  • Any Degree - Bellevue University, Ferris State University, Franklin University, Northwood University, Spring Arbor University
  • Accounting - Colorado State University, Davenport University, Northwood University
  • Architecture - University of Detroit Mercy
  • Art+ Design - Central Michigan University, College of Creative Studies
  • Chemical Technology - Central Michigan University
  • Child Development - Ferris State University
  • Computer Science and Information Technology - Capitol College, Davenport University, Eastern Michigan University, Northwood University
  • Criminal Justice - Ferris State University, Franklin University, University of Phoenix
  • Dental Hygiene - University of Detroit Mercy
  • Electronic Media/Broadcasting - Ferris State University, Northern Michigan University
  • Health Fitness Specialist - Central Michigan University
  • Legal Support Professional - Eastern Michigan University
  • Management - Colorado State University, Davenport University, Eastern Michigan University, Franklin University, Northwood University, Walsh University
  • Mechanical Engineering Technology - Central Michigan University, Michigan Technical University
  • Nursing - Davenport University, Ferris State University, Franklin University, Saginaw Valley State University, University of Detroit Mercy, University of Michigan - Flint, University of Phoenix

Consortium Agreement with Four-Year Institution: Delta College has signed a consortium agreement with the following 4-Year Institutions to concurrently earn an Associate of Science degree at Delta College and a certificate at the 4-Year Institution.

  • Agricultural Operations - Michigan State University - College of Agriculture and Natural Resources Institute of Agricultural Technology
  • Fruit and Vegetable Crop Management - Michigan State University - College of Agriculture and Natural Resources Institute of Agricultural Technology

Career Education Articulations/Transfer Agreements With Michigan Community Colleges: Delta College has signed Career Education program articulation/transfer agreements with the following Michigan community colleges:

  • Chemical Process Technology - Alpena Community College, Bay College, Mid-Michigan Community College
  • Criminal Justice-Law Enforcement with Basic Police Training - Alpena Community College, Mid-Michigan Community College
  • Dental Hygiene - Alpena Community College
  • Maritime Deck Officer - Northwestern Michigan College
  • Water Environmental Technology - Grand Rapids Community College

Reverse Transfer Agreements with Michigan Four-Year Colleges and Universities: Delta College is a participant in the Reverse Transfers with the following four-year institutions:

  • Central Michigan University
  • Eastern Michigan University
  • Ferris State University
  • Grand Valley State University
  • Lake Superior State University
  • Michigan State University
  • Michigan Technological University
  • Saginaw Valley State University
  • University of Michigan - Ann Arbor
  • University of Michigan - Flint
  • Wayne State University
  • Western Michigan University

Partnerships with K-12, Intermediate School Districts, and Secondary Education Initiatives: In addition, Delta College participates as an active partner in the following activities with K-12 and Intermediate School Districts:

  • Career Preparation: Delta College was an active partner in career preparation activities in Arenac, Bay, Midland, and Saginaw Counties, primarily in the career pathways component.  The College has organized its career education programs into six career pathways and sponsors an annual Career Pathways Open House for over 1,900 middle and high school students.  The College is a member of the Educational Advisory Group (EAG).
  • Educational Partnerships: Delta College actively participates as a member of the Board/Steering Committee for the Saginaw Business and Education Partnership, the Bay County Business and Education Partnership, and the Midland County Chamber of Commerce Educational Partnership.

An example of one of our dual enrollment partnerships is between Delta College and Birch Run Area Schools.  Delta College and Birch Run are partnering to offer students the opportunity to earn an Associate of Arts degree while earning their high school diploma.  A small cohort of students attend college and high school classes together for a total of three academic years.  These students will enroll in AP as well as college classes.  They will attend the college classes at Birch Run High School.  Upon completing the program, the students will have their high school diploma and an associate’s degree from Delta College.

Delta College is a partner in the Great Lakes Bay Early College.  Students enrolled in the early college program can earn up to 60 college credits during high school. 

  • Programs/Events: are conducted on an ongoing basis.  Examples of activities include: the Science Olympiad, Middle School Math Competition, Student Technical Solutions Competition, Career Fairs, Possible Dream Program activities, summer camps, and campus tours.

Partnerships with Business/Industry: Delta College has numerous partnerships with business/industry to provide employees with the training and retraining to obtain the skills for the 21st century workforce.  Examples of recent partnerships include:

  • Chemical Process Operator Training: in partnership with Dow Chemical, Dow Corning, and Hemlock Semiconductor, Delta College provides a 480 hour accelerated training program for chemical process operators (prior to hire) and pre and post deployment training for recently hired chemical process operators.
  • Advanced Manufacturing Training: in partnership with Nexteer, the Advanced Manufacturing Fast Start program provides 160 hours of accelerated pre-hire training for manufacturing positions.
  • Diesel Technician Training: in partnership with Great Lakes Bay Michigan Works!, over 20 diesel industry employers, and Saginaw Future to offer a 10 week accelerated pre-hire training for entry level diesel technicians.
  • General Motors Corporation: Delta College is a primary training supplier to the General Motors Corporation, and is in partnership to operate the Automotive Service Education Program (ASEP).
  • A variety of internships, cooperative education, and work-experience programs are in place with employers in Bay, Midland, and Saginaw Counties.
  • Delta College has signed agreements with area hospitals and healthcare facilities for nursing, allied health, and short-term occupational health programs. In the Fall 2016 semester, the College has clinical sites for the following programs: Athletic Training (1), Certified Nursing Assistant (11 sites), Dental Hygiene/Assisting (31 sites), EMT (4 sites), Fitness (9 sites), Health Unit Coordinator (4 sites), Nursing (27 sites), Phlebotomy (4 sites), Physical Therapy Assistant (57 sites), Radiography (14 sites), Respiratory Care (9 sites), Diagnostic Medical Sonography (23 sites) and Surgical Technology (9 sites).
  • Delta College has a total of 36 Advisory Committees to provide information and support to occupational programs with over 600 members.  Advisory Committees are in the Business & Information Technology (7), English (1), Health & Wellness (9), Humanities (2), Science (3), Social Science (3), and Technical Trades & Manufacturing (11).

c) Identify other initiatives which may impact facilities usage:

Saginaw Center Project

Delta College’s Saginaw Center is designed to provide educational access to the residents of the City of Saginaw and southeastern Saginaw County.  By delivering close-to-home classes, we will be addressing the needs of many students who are making their first strides into the post-secondary educational realm.  Within this safe environment, many first generation students find success, which can lead to a continuing cycle of education.

Delta College currently leases a 1950s era elementary school in the Buena Vista area.  If approved, the Delta College Saginaw Center would replace that space with a new 35,000 square foot building.  The proposed new facility will be designed to be flexible to teach general education, skilled trades, healthcare, and other career courses.  It will include high level technology, special use training rooms, eight to ten classrooms, and basic science and computer labs.  The new facility will strengthen Delta’s ability to deliver the highest caliber of college education and workforce training.  It will also provide multi-purpose rooms/labs, students service, and administrative support spaces. 

This project would help improve utilization of existing space and infrastructure by providing an environment that allows a larger variety of courses and the opportunity for complete associate degrees and certificates to be offered in the Delta College outlying community.

d) Demonstrate economic development impact of current/future programs (i.e. technical training centers, Life Science Corridor initiative, etc.):

Delta College actively participates in economic development initiatives in Bay, Midland, and Saginaw Counties (and to the extent possible in Arenac and Tuscola Counties).  To prepare residents for successful employment in high wage, high skill, high demand occupations, the College has worked closely with State agencies such as the Michigan Economic Development Corporation; economic development agencies including each of the Great Lakes Bay Region’s Chambers of Commerce, Saginaw Future, Bay Future, Bay County Economic Development Corporation, the Bay City Economic Development Commission, Midland Tomorrow, and the Arenac County Economic Development Corporation; Saginaw Valley State University; Michigan Works! in the Great Lakes Bay Region, Region 7B, and Thumb Area regions; and employers.  These economic development initiatives have resulted in the Bay County Technology Park; designation of a Renaissance Zone in Saginaw; the location and/or relocation of several industries to the  Great Lakes Bay Region; industrial expansion in the region; upgrading the skills of the workforce to current and future industry standards (especially in the chemical and alternative energy industries); training/retraining the unemployed to actively participate in high skill, high wage, high demand jobs; assisting employers to obtain qualified workers to fill vacant positions; and increasing the productivity of area business and industry.

Recent economic development activities have included strategic planning and environmental scanning with the Workforce Development Board and the East Central Michigan Regional Skills Alliance in Health Care to identify the occupations in demand in the Great Lakes Bay and Thumb regions.  The high wage, high skill, high demand occupations in this region that have been identified are:

  • Health Care: medical billing, dental hygiene, registered nurse, CENA, respiratory therapists, licensed practical nurse, and dental assisting.
  • Manufacturing Technologies: chemical process operators, solar manufacturing, lithium battery manufacturing, skilled trades, machine operators, machinists, computer numerical control operators, welders, machine repair/maintenance, and shipping/receiving.
  • Information Technology/Office Administration: computer applications, computer programmer, computer receptionist/help desk, and administrative assistant.
  • Services: accounting/finance, corrections officer, and transportation.

Delta College provides academic programs in a majority of these areas, and can provide customized training through Corporate Services to meet the needs of employers.  As training and educational opportunities are identified, Delta College reviews its programs to assure that the training provided meets the skill levels required by area employers.

Section III - Staffing and Enrollment

III. STAFFING AND ENROLLMENT

a) Describe current full- and part-time student enrollment levels by academic program and define how the programs are accessed by the student (i.e., main or satellite campus instruction, collaboration efforts with other institutions, Internet or distance learning, etc.):

Current Enrollment Patterns: Delta College offers 84 certificates and 91 Associate degrees; approximately 38% of students select transfer programs to attend a four-year institution to complete a Bachelor’s degree, and 62% of students identified career education programs to directly enter the workforce upon completion of a certificate or Associate degree.

A majority of Delta College students enroll in face-to-face/traditional classes at the College's main campus. However, the College operates major off-campus centers to provide additional access to postsecondary education in the communities served by the College. At this point, students pursuing an Associate degree would enroll in courses at the main campus, however, they could complete a substantial portion of their coursework through a combination of attending classes at an off-campus site and/or distance delivery systems. Students are able to complete certain Associate degrees through distance education courses.

Five-Year Enrollment Trend/Pattern:

During the Fall 2012 semester, student headcount and credit hours decreased with a total of 10,791 students enrolled in academic and skilled trades/apprenticeship classes at Delta College, generating 98,888 credit hours. The average student credit hour load increased to 9.2 credit hours, reflecting the fact that 61.4% of the students enrolled attended part-time and 38.6% attended full-time. The statistics of the Fall 2012 students are:

Gender:
Female     55%
Male          45%

Class Designation:
Freshman     64.4%
Sophomores  35.6%

Age Distribution:
0-19 years      30.5%
20-24 years    33.9%
25-29 years    12.9%
30-44 years    17.1%
45 and over      5.6%

Ethnic Background:
African American     9.4%
Native American      0.6%
Asian                            1.0%
Caucasian                 79.5%
Hispanic                      6.1%
International              0.1%
Multi-racial                 1.8%
Non-Coded                1.4%

Student enrollment patterns during the Fall 2012 semester indicated that:
Attending Day hours only               48.8%
Day and Evening Combination     52.9%
Evening Hours Only                               6.7%
Weekends Only                                        0.1%
Distance Education Only                    8.0%

During the Fall 2013 semester, student headcount and credit hours declined with a total of 10,301 students enrolled in academic and skilled trades/apprenticeship classes at Delta College, generating 93,529 credit hours. The average student credit hour load decreased slightly to 9.047 credit hours. 62.32% of students enrolled attended part-time and 38.6% attended full-time. The statistics of the Fall 2013 students are:

Gender:
Female     54.8%
Male          45.2%

Class Designation:
Freshman     64.8%
Sophomores  35.2%

Age Distribution:
0-19 years      31.4%
20-24 years    33.8%
25-29 years    12.6%
30-44 years    16.7%
45 and over      5.5%

Ethnic Background:
African American     9.5%
Native American      0.5%
Asian                            0.8%
Caucasian                 79.5%
Hispanic                      6.2%
International              0.2%
Multi-racial                 1.9%
Non-Coded                1.4%

Student enrollment patterns during the Fall 2013 semester indicated that:
Attending Day hours only               26.7%
Day and Evening Combination     60.1%
Evening Hours Only                               5.9%
Weekends Only                                        0.1%
Distance Education Only                     7.2%

During the Fall 2014 semester, student headcount and credit hours generated decreased from the previous Fall semester, with a total of 9,842 students enrolled in academic and skilled trades/apprenticeship classes at Delta College generating a total of 89,446 credit hours. The average student credit hour load was 9.08 credit hours, reflecting the fact that 62.52% of the students enrolled attended part-time and 37.48% attended full-time. The statistics of the Fall 2014 students are:

Gender:                                            
Female     55.3%                            
Male          44.7%

Class Designation:
Freshman     64.04%
Sophomores  35.96%

Age Distribution:
0-19 years      33.52%
20-24 years    33.28%
25-29 years    12.56%
30-44 years    15.61%
45 and over      5.05%

Ethnic Background:
African American     9.41%
Native American        .59%
Asian                               .82%
Caucasian                 79.56%
Hispanic                      6.66%
International              0.20%
Multi-racial                 1.52%
Non-Coded                1.20%

Geographic Distribution:
Bay County             27.33%
Midland County    15.81%
Saginaw County    41.73%
Tuscola County        5.77%
Huron County          2.02%
Arenac County         1.54%
Other Counties        5.75%
Other States                .03%

Student enrollment patterns during the Fall 2014 semester indicated that:
Attending Day hours only               49.28%
Day and Evening Combination     35.36%
Evening Hours Only                               5.59%
Weekends Only                                           .30%
Distance Education Only                     9.74%

During the Fall 2015 semester, student headcount and credit hours declined with a total of 9,291 students enrolled in academic and skilled trades/apprenticeship classes at Delta College, generating 84,039 credit hours. The average student credit hour load decreased slightly to 9.04 credit hours.  63.03% of the students enrolled attended part-time and 36.97% attended full-time. The statistics of the Fall 2015 students are:

Gender:
Female     54.38%
Male          35.52%

Age Distribution:
0-19 years      35.73%
20-24 years    33.28%
25-29 years    12.00%
30-44 years    14.61%
45 and over      4.61%

Class Designation:                       
Freshman     64.48%                      
Sophomores  35.52%

Ethnic Background:
African American     7.86%
Native American        .59%
Asian                              .89%
Caucasian                 80.98%
Hispanic                      6.39%
International              0.16%
Multi-racial                 1.57%
Non-Coded                1.46%

Student enrollment patterns during the Fall 2015 semester indicated that:
Attending Day hours only               26.14%
Day and Evening Combination     60.28%
Evening Hours Only                               5.03%
Weekends Only                                         0.14%
Distance Education Only                     8.41%

During the Fall 2016 semester, student headcount and credit hours generated decreased from the previous Fall semester, with a total of 9,132 students enrolled in academic and skilled trades/apprenticeship classes at Delta College generating a total of 82,485.4 credit hours. The average student credit hour load was 9.03 credit hours, reflecting the fact that 63.59% of the students enrolled attended part-time and 36.41% attended full-time. The statistics of the Fall 2016 students are:

Gender:                                               
Female     55.3%                              
Male          44.7%

Age Distribution:
0-19 years      38.18%
20-24 years    32.19%
25-29 years    11.66%
30-44 years    13.67%
45 and over      4.29%

Class Designation:                       
Freshman     66.32%                      
Sophomores  33.68%

Ethnic Background:
African American     7.51%
Native American        .48%
Asian                              .70%
Caucasian                 80.44%
Hispanic                      6.48%
International              0.61%
Multi-racial                 2.11%
Non-Coded                1.61%

Student enrollment patterns during the Fall 2016 semester indicated that:
Attending Day hours only                  26.83%
Day and Evening Combination        58.49%
Evening hours only                                   4.18%
Weekends only                                            0.18%
Distance Education Only                     10.33%

Project enrollment patterns over the next five years (including distance learning initiatives):

While Delta College enrollments were on the increase for several years (as documented below), enrollment declined Fall 2012, Fall 2013, Fall 2014, Fall 2015 and Fall 2016. The decreases in enrollments that the College is experiencing can be attributed to some changing characteristics of the Great Lakes Bay Region (College’s district) population. Some of the factors leading to a “shifting” enrollment are as follows:

In many parts of the country secondary enrollments are projected to increase. However, this is not the case in the Great Lakes Bay Region. Michigan is one of just three states projected to show decreased enrollments of more than 5% between the 2013-2014 academic year and the 2025-2026 academic year. Visit National Center for Education Statistics for more information.

Michigan’s elementary and secondary enrollment in charter schools has increased in the last several years. In the 2012-2013 academic year these enrollments accounted for 8.4% of public school enrollments. Visit National Center for Education Statistics for more information.

In the two most recent years available, 2013-2014 and 2014-2015 academic years, secondary enrollments in public schools have decreased. The Delta College District overall has lost 2.2% of its secondary enrollments in these years, with Midland County gaining 1.3%, Saginaw County losing 3.8% and Bay County down 1.8%. 

Since Delta College has continued to enroll a large percentage of high school graduates from Bay, Midland, and Saginaw Counties (approximately 28% of June graduates enroll the following fall semester at Delta College), this enrollment will continue and perhaps slightly decrease in the next few years. However, enrollment declines from recent high school graduates are expected to be off-set by the increased enrollment of out-district high school graduates (Tuscola and Huron Counties), dual enrolled high school students  who are enrolled either in charter schools or being home schooled; or who are participating in dual enrollment or early college opportunities; students enrolling in online education courses; and students who could enroll in a four-year institution who choose a more affordable community college.

While a majority of students who enroll in distance learning options also enroll simultaneously in courses provided through traditional delivery (face-to-face), the percentage of Delta College students who only enrolled in distance learning has increased in the last ten years. The number of credit hours generated by students enrolling in distance learning classes is 15,049 (Fall 2016). Delta College is currently developing additional distance learning options to increase the access to postsecondary education for the residents of the College's district. The College received approval in August 2002 from the Higher Learning Commission North Central Association to offer an Associate of Arts degree totally through distance education, and received accreditation to offer all Associate degrees (with the exception of Fine Arts which was not submitted) via distance education in April 2004.  Additional Delta College faculty are obtaining the qualifications to provide instruction through Internet, and they are preparing additional course offerings for distance learning delivery. It is expected that additional distance learning course offerings will be available, and therefore, enrollments are expected to increase proportionally in these courses.

While the College predicts enrollment to decline slightly or remain flat, we are strengthening initiatives such as dual enrollment, community outreach, and our overall marketing strategies to ensure that further declines can be minimized.  The goal is to stabilize or increase enrollment even though our environment has changed - resulting in the shift that is mentioned above.

b) Evaluate enrollment patterns over the last fives:

Credit Hours Generated by Division
Fall 2012 - Fall 2016 Semesters

Division 

2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

Overall

Health/
Wellness

9,779

9,494

9,306

8,831.50

8,872

46,283

Business/
Information Technology

16,139

14,717

13,807

13,452.50

11,990

70,106

English

12,633

11,168

11,247

10,533.00

10,193

55,774

Humanities

10,847

10,364

10,020

8,817.00

8,948

48,996

Math

11,935

11,409

10,880

10,338.00

10,389

54,951

Science

12,357

11,956

10,809

10,789.00

10,670.40

56,581

Social Science

18,828

18,584

17,856

16,000.00

16,183

87,451

Technical/
Skilled Trades

6,370

5,836

5,518

5,278.00

5,240

28,242

TOTALS

98,888

93,528

89,443

84,039

82,485.40

448,383.40

 

In general, the enrollment trends over the past five years by credit hours generated have declined. (It should be noted that 2011 was the high point in an enrollment bubble for the College.  As the economy returned to a healthier state in our region, people returned to work and enrollments began to decline.) In Fall 2016, by academic divisions, the enrollments declined in all divisions.  Overall, credit hour enrollment declined by 1.85% from Fall 2015 to Fall 2016.

As a comparison over the past five years: 1) in the Health/Wellness Division, the credits generated declined from the Fall 2012 to the Fall 2016 semester by 907 credits;  2) in the Business and Information Technology Division, the enrollment between the Fall 2012 and the Fall 2016 semesters decreased by 4,149 credit hours; 3) in the English Division, the enrollment between Fall 2012 to Fall 2016 decreased by 2,440 credits; 4) in the Humanities Division, the enrollment between the Fall 2012 to the Fall 2016 semesters decreased by 1,899 credit hours;  5) in the Math Division, the enrollment between Fall 2012 to the Fall 2016 semesters decreased by 1,546 credit hours; 6) in the Science Division, the enrollment between the Fall 2012 to the Fall 2016 semesters decreased by 1,687 credit hours; 7) in the Social Science Division, the enrollment between the Fall 2012 to the Fall 2016 semesters decreased by 2,645 credit hours; and 8) in the Technical Trades and Manufacturing/Skilled Trades Division, the enrollment between the Fall 2012 to the Fall 2016  semesters decreased by 1,130 credit hours.

d) Provide instructional staff/student and administrative staff/student ratios for major academic programs or colleges:

The instructional staffing at Delta College has remained fairly constant over the past five years. As faculty positions become vacant, they are reviewed and evaluated by the appropriate Division Chair, Dean of Teaching and Learning, Vice President of Instruction and Learning Services, and the College's Executive staff prior to posting/refilling the vacancy. This review and evaluation process assures that course and program enrollments are appropriate to assure a faculty load, and positions are posted/refilled by tenure-track positions, one-year appointments, and adjunct faculty based on projected enrollment patterns.

During the Fall 2012 semester, Delta College employed 219 full-time and 360 adjunct faculty in eight academic divisions of the College.  Based on the headcount of 10,791 students, the full-time faculty to student ratio averaged 1:49. Including adjunct faculty, the ratio of faculty to students is 1:18. The College employs 143 full-time administrative/professional staff.  Therefore, the administrative/professional staff to student ratio is:  1:75.

During the Fall 2013 semester, Delta College employed 216 full-time and 360 adjunct faculty in eight academic divisions of the College.  Based on the headcount of 10,301 students, the full-time faculty to student ratio averaged 1:47. Including adjunct faculty, the ratio of faculty to students is 1:18. The College employs 133 full-time administrative/professional staff.  Therefore, the administrative/professional staff to student ratio is:  1:77.

During the Fall 2014 semester, Delta College employed 214 full-time and 318 adjunct faculty in eight academic divisions of the College.  Based on the headcount of 9,842 students, the full-time faculty to student ratio averaged 1:45. Including adjunct faculty, the ratio of faculty to students is 1:15. The College employs 128 full-time administrative/professional staff.  Therefore, the administrative/professional staff to student ratio is:  1:76. 

During the Fall 2015 semester, Delta College employed 207 full-time and 335 adjunct faculty in eight academic divisions of the College.  Based on the headcount of 9,291 students, the full-time faculty to student ratio averaged 1:45. Including adjunct faculty, the ratio of faculty to students is 1:17. The College employs 125 full-time administrative/professional staff.  Therefore, the administrative/professional staff to student ratio is:  1:74.

During the Fall 2016 semester, Delta College employed 204 full-time and 333 adjunct faculty in eight academic divisions of the College.  Based on the headcount of 9,132 students, the full-time faculty to student ratio averaged 1:44. Including adjunct faculty, the ratio of faculty to students is 1:17. The College employs 125 full-time administrative/professional staff.  Therefore, the administrative/professional staff to student ratio is:  1:73.

e) Project future staffing needs based on 5-year enrollment estimates and future programming changes:

While programming needs and instructional delivery may “shift” based on the needs of the workforce and area residents, Delta College enrollment has declined and is expected to remain fairly stable for the next 2-3 years.  Staffing patterns may change to reflect changes in programming; the ratio of faculty in certain disciplines may change to reflect curricula needs (to be identified), and likewise, the College may require faculty with different professional skills/expertise. Staffing needs are reviewed by the appropriate Division Chair, Dean of Teaching and Learning, Vice President of Instruction and Learning Services, and the College's Executive staff prior to posting/refilling the vacancy. This review and evaluation process assures that course and program enrollments are appropriate to assure a faculty load, and positions are posted/refilled by tenure-track positions, one-year appointments, and adjunct faculty based on projected enrollment patterns. This process assures that student enrollment patterns are addressed and resources are maximized. In several cases, the College has provided retraining opportunities to provide faculty with opportunities to transition into higher demand programs. 

f) Identify current average class size and projected average class size based on institution's mission and planned programming changes:

Existing class sizes are anticipated to remain similar to current enrollments. A majority of the College classes enroll 25-30 students per course (average).  Average projected class size is 17-20 students.

Section IV - Facilities Assessment

IV. FACILITY ASSESSMENT

A professionally developed comprehensive facilities assessment is required.  The assessment must identify and evaluate the overall condition of capital facilities under college or university control.  The description must include facility age, use patterns, and an assessment of general physical condition.  The assessment must specifically identify:

a) Summary description of each facility (administrative, classroom, biology, hospital, etc.) according to categories outlined in “net-to-gross ratio guidelines for various building types,” DMB-Office of Design and Construction Major Project Design Manual, appendix 7. If facility is of more than one “type”, please identify the percentage of each type within a given facility.

Facilities Condition Analysis

In the fall of 2000, the firm of Duce Simmons Associates was hired to complete a Facilities Condition Analysis and develop a database that could be updated annually.  Attached is a copy of the updated Inventory and Deferred Maintenance Capital Planning Database Report.  This report identifies percentage of building type for each facility.

Master Plan

In 2002, the firm of JJR was hired to update the campus master plan.  Attached is a copy of the updated 2003 Campus Master Plan.

In the fall of 2014, SmithGroupJJR was again hired to update the master plan for the West side of our campus.  Attached is a copy of the West Campus Master Plan Update - December 2014.

b) Building and/or classroom utilization rates (Percentage of rooms used, and percent capacity). Identify building/classroom usage rates for peak (M-F, 10-3), off-peak (M-F, 8-10 am., 3-5 pm.), evening and weekend periods.

Please see attached 2016 Classroom Utilization Report.

c) Mandated facility standards for specific programs, where applicable (i.e. federal/industry standards for laboratory, animal, or agricultural research facilities, hospitals, use of industrial machinery, etc.).

Pending further clarification and definition of mandated standards or potential specific grant requirements, this section does not appear to apply to Delta College facilities.

d) Functionality of existing structures and space allocation to program areas served.

Pending further clarification of specific requirements under this section, functionality of existing structures and space allocation to program areas has not been specifically addressed, but has been generally incorporated into the Section IV. a), Facility Assessment; and Priorities #1, #2, #3 and #4, in Section V. a), Implementation Plan.

e) Replacement value of existing facilities (insured value of structure to the extent available).

Please see attached 2015 Insurance Appraisal  of Delta College.

 f) Utility system condition (i.e., heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC), water and sewage, electrical, etc.).

Generally our utility systems are in good condition.  The college is budgeting $1,000,000 annually for Facilities Maintenance.  See IV. a) above for specific information in our “Facilities Conditions Analysis” and Priority #5, Central Heating and Cooling System Upgrades in Section V. f), Implementation Plan.

g) Facility infrastructure condition (i.e. roads, bridges, parking structures, lots, etc.).

Generally our facilities infrastructure is in good condition.  The college is budgeting $1,000,000 annually for Facilities Maintenance.  See IV. a) above for specific information in our “Facilities Conditions Analysis” and Priority #2, #3 and #4 in Section V. f), Implementation Plan, Maintenance Schedule for Roads and Parking Lots.

h) Adequacy of existing utilities and infrastructure systems to current and 5-year projected programmatic needs.

Our current utilities and infrastructure systems are adequate to meet our planned needs.  Appropriate modifications and changes will be incorporated into each project.

The college is budgeting $2,000,000 annually for Capital Improvements and Facilities Maintenance.  See IV. a) above for specific information in our “Facilities Conditions Analysis” and Priority #5, Central Heating and Cooling System Upgrades in Section V. f), Implementation Plan.

i) Does the institution have an enterprise-wide energy plan? What are its goals?  Have energy audits been completed on all facilities, if not, what is the plan/timetable for completing such audits?                                         

Although the College does not have a formal enterprise-wide energy plan, we have adopted a comprehensive sustainability plan, see attached, and are currently working with Consumers Energy as a pilot facility for their Existing Building Commission Program. 

Additionally, the college recently adopted Energy Conservation Guidelines as outlined by the Delta College Energy Conservation Council. The charge of the Council is to institutionalize energy conservation and efficiency in the campus culture through an educational and collaborative approach.

As one of five Michigan signatory colleges to the American College & University President’s Climate Commitment (ACUPCC) in 2007, Delta College agreed to initiate activities designed to move the campus towards climate neutrality.

Our Campus Sustainability Plan is a roadmap for creating a path toward a sustainable campus.  Delta College is committed to reducing its carbon footprint while also planning for future growth and development.  The plan specifically targets our campus carbon footprint with consideration for the improvement of the local environment and quality of life in Michigan.

The plan focuses on activities, practices, and processes which directly impact campus greenhouse gas emissions and those which indirectly may influence emissions. Within those areas, we consider: Operations (buildings, transportation, waste management, energy, purchasing, and auxiliary services); Education (curriculum, research, professional development); Administration & Finance (infrastructure, investment, planning).  Our goal is to systematically incorporate sustainable practices and decision processes throughout our operations and academic curriculum and to serve as a catalyst for awareness and education throughout the College community.

Delta College is also a voluntary signatory of the Sustainability Tracking and Rating System (STARS).  STARS is a self-reporting benchmark which gages progress in areas such as academics, public engagement, purchasing, dining services, buildings and grounds, coordination and planning, and diversity and affordability. The College participated in a 2008 pilot rating which set the foundation for future measurements and a formal benchmark report submitted in 2011  for which the college earned a high rating. In 2016, the College will participate in an expanded version of STARS to benchmark our progress. STARS enables our campus to track meaningful comparisons over time and across similar institutions and create incentives for continual improvement. It allows for   information sharing among higher education institutions and promotes a comprehensive understanding of sustainability.

Long before greening and sustainability were buzzwords, conservation, efficiency, and recycling were standard operating practices based on efficiency, cost savings, and environmental awareness.  This history of successful environmentally-conscious ventures has evolved into a holistic approach to campus sustainability. 

In 1990, the College hired Manyam and Associates, Inc. to conduct a Comprehensive Energy Systems/Facilities Audit.

As a result of information documented in this Comprehensive Energy Systems/ Facilities Audit, from 1993 through 1996 the college completed significant upgrades to our central energy plant and other energy-related improvements with financial assistance from Department of Energy grants and Consumers Energy “Reduce the Use” grants.  The projects were as follows:

  1. Building Automation System – Replaced our outdated energy management system with a new “Facility Management System – (FMS)” which includes all of the equipment control functions and building information management in a single system architecture. The system is fully integrated and fully interactive integrating software into distributed hardware to perform traditional “Building Automation System – (BAS)”, “Energy Management System – (EMS)” and “Direct Digital Controls – (DDC)” functions in a single network.
  2. Chilled Water Plant – Existing R-11 refrigerant chillers were replaced with new R-123 chillers. Other chiller plant improvements included a thermal ice storage system, variable speed drive pumps and new cooling towers.
  3. Boilers – Existing boilers were replaced with equipment sized to better match our current and projected loads.
  4. Lighting Retrofit – Existing fluorescent lighting fixtures were converted to new electronic ballast and T-8 (32 watt) lamps.
  5. Motor Replacement – Selected standard motors were replaced with high efficiency motors.

In addition to the above energy related projects, in 1997 the College began the first major phase of our Facilities Renewal and Upgrade Program, the Science and Learning Technology Facility project, which was completed in 1999.  It upgraded approximately 20 percent of our facilities, including major renovations and additions to the science areas, including the disciplines of chemistry, physics, and biology.  It also converted the library into a true-learning resource center, enhancing the function of distance learning, and allowing for the implementation of new instructional technologies.

The second phase of the Facilities Renewal and Upgrade Program, referred to as Campus Renovation II, was completed in February 2004.  It was a broad-based program designed to address a large segment of the remaining critical facilities needs.

Campus Renovation II - Project A consisted of approximately 48,749 square feet of new space and approximately 96,111 square feet of renovated space.  The project included our Automotive, Construction Technology, Welding, Heating Ventilation and Air Conditioning, Machine Tool, Computer Numerical Control (CNC), Advanced Manufacturing, Motion Control, Metallurgy, Skilled Trades, General Education and Humanities Programs.

Campus Renovation II - Project B consisted of approximately 3,170 square feet of new space and approximately 105,958 square feet of renovated space.  The project included our Health and Wellness, General Education and Humanities, Telecommunications and Student and Support Services Areas.

The third phase of our Facilities Renewal and Upgrade Program, entitled J Wing and East Courtyard Renovations, was completed in September 2005.  The project included extensive renovations to J Wing and minor renovations to H wing and the East Courtyard Areas designed to address facilities needs in the following areas:

a) General Education & Business Programs included renovated space to enhance general classrooms and computer training laboratories.
b) Faculty and Staff Development Office included redesign of areas for Instructional Support Services, Faculty Center for Teaching Excellence, eLearning, eDesign, Employee Training Center and general Faculty Offices.
c) Business Resources Center included office space for Corporate Services, Workforce Development Center and the Small Business and Technology Development Center.

This project involved approximately 34,900 gross square feet of renovated space with a small addition of approximately 650 square feet.

All of the above projects were designed to meet or exceed the energy codes at the time.  Examples of some of the components included in the designs were heat recovery coils in the ventilation system for our science and automobile labs, variable frequency drives on HVAC motors and pumps, a heat recovery air handling unit for our swimming pool, additional thermal ice storage tanks for our chilled water system and white reflective roofing.

In 2008, the college completed a comprehensive Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Inventory for the main campus spanning 1999-2008.  As a method to reduce our campus carbon footprint, a four day work week (Green Fridays) was piloted.  We have since conducted annual greenhouse gas inventories which include GHG Emissions.

In May 2009, the Delta College Board of Trustees supported a recommendation by the Delta College Senate to revise Senate Policy 1.007 to incorporate Sustainability into our Guiding Principles.

Delta College is committed to promoting learning, actions and practices that incorporate social, environmental, and economic sustainability in our communities.

 

The four day work week was expanded beyond the 2008 pilot to a 10 week program in the Spring/Summer 2009 and is currently incorporated into our annual schedule.

We are currently working with Consumers Energy to implement energy conservation measures as part of their energy conservation incentive rebate program.  We have been selected to participate in their Existing Building Commission Pilot program (“EBCx”).

The first step of the program included an energy audit with energy recommendations.  Our facility was benchmarked versus similar facilities in our region to determine whether we are a high or low energy user.  The remaining part of the EBCx program was separated into three phases to evaluate what activities are most cost effective for Delta College and Consumers Energy’s Energy Optimization program. These three phases are detailed below.

Phase I: Energy Audit/O&M Review
This phase involves a thorough review of operations and maintenance practices to ensure the facility is being operated in compliance with the current facility requirements (CFR). The investigations in this phase are centered on identifying low and no cost facility improvement measures that can result in reduced energy consumption and improved facility performance. Customers will receive training at the end of this phase on maintaining the CFR, O&M best practices and how to maintain the facility improvements identified in this phase.

Engineers hired by Consumers Energy completed their initial site survey in November 2009 and Consumers Energy delivered the Phase I report on February 11, 2010.  (See attached Executive Summary of the Consumers Energy EBCx Operations & Maintenanve Report).

Phase II: Systems Commissioning
This phase utilizes performance testing, trending and metering to ensure that the existing systems are capable of meeting the current facility requirements (CFR). Measures identified during these investigations correspond with repairs, upgrades, and capitol planning that will allow existing systems to operate within the required parameters. For larger systems, sampling of similar components will be encouraged to contain costs. Customers will receive training at the end of this phase on maintaining the systems commissioning and how to maintain the facility improvements identified in this phase.

Based on the information obtained in the Phase I analysis, engineers hired by Consumers Energy developed a systems commissioning plan.  The Phase II Systems Commissioning Kick-off meeting was held in April 2010.  The engineers completed function testing in July 2010 and Consumers Energy delivered their Phase II report on October 15, 2010.  (See attached Executive Summary of the Consumers Energy EBCx Systems Commissioning Report). Many of the Facility Improvement Measures (FIM’s) identified in the Phase I and II reports are being implemented or will be included in the Phase III Systems Optimization Plans.

Phase III: Systems Optimization
The final phase of the EBCx program will involve introducing more complex high performance building operation strategies. This phase builds on the work done in the prior phases to introduce the cutting edge practices that are being created and introduced for today’s high performance buildings. Customers will receive training from the retro-commission service provider (RSP) at the end of this phase on how to maintain the facility improvements identified in this phase, incorporating alarming, and how to utilize BAS trending effectively.

Since 2009 the college has implemented a number of lighting replacement and control projects, modified the ventilation systems serving our automotive training facilities and completed major upgrades to our chilled water plant.  These improvements and changes made as a result of the audit and in consultation with Consumers Energy have contributed to a 22.7 percent reduction in our annual electricity usage and a 28.2 percent reduction in gas usage from 2008 through 2012.  We are currently upgrading our building automation systems which when completed will improve our monitoring, scheduling and temperature control functions.

In 2012 the college completed the phase one upgrades of our existing central heating and cooling systems with the main objective to reduce our total electric and gas consumption and thereby also reducing the overall carbon footprint of the facility.  Combined the current central heating and central cooling plant produce approximately 5301 metric tons of CO2 emissions.

By implementing this project the potential natural gas consumption reduction would represent over 35,000 MCF of gas at a savings of $280,000 and lowers CO2 emissions by almost 1900 metric tons per year.  The potential electric consumption reduction would represent approximately 280,000 kWh of electricity at a savings of over $18,500 and lowers CO2 emissions by 106 metric tons per year.  The combined totals equal $298,500 in energy savings and a reduction of over 2000 metric tons of CO2 emissions produced by the facility.  In addition to the reduction in energy consumption, this project will result in additional significant energy cost savings by reducing and / or eliminating the need to run a chiller during the peak electrical period.  The estimated annual savings is approximately $52,000.  This equals a combined projected energy cost savings of $350,500.

Implementation of this project will update the College to the latest in Green Technologies with such items as, but not limited to, the following:

  • Expansion of the existing ice storage system (Completed in 2012)
  • High efficiency condensing boiler technology
  • Geothermal chiller/heat recovery system, which can provide free heating during simultaneous heating and cooling needs of the campus
  • High efficiency condensing domestic hot water heating system
  • Chemical-free cooling tower treatment system to eliminate the need for harmful chemicals and save chemical costs (completed in 2012)
  • Condenser water strainer to improve chiller and cooling tower performance and greatly reduce cold water make-up requirements (completed in 2012)

These upgrades will provide the College with the most energy efficient heating and cooling systems and offer the greatest flexibility of operation and take advantage of peak efficiencies during all types of weather.

The project is divided into three major components.  Although the first two components can be completed independently they are required in order to implement the third component.  All three components will need to be completed to achieve the maximum energy savings.

  1. Cooling System Renovations and Upgrades (completed in 2012)
    This portion of the project involves upgrading two existing 750 ton chillers, replacement of 354 ton steam absorption chiller with new 750 ton chiller with ice making capabilities, note: this removes steam load in preparation for hot water conversion of heating system, installation of 21 ice tanks or 3,500 ton hours to bring campus back to full ice storage.

    The project would also include the upgrade of related pumping systems, cooling towers and electrical components to support the new plant.

  2. Hybrid Hot Water Boiler System
    This project involves the conversion of the existing steam heating system to hybrid high efficiency hot water system.  It will include the conversion of two 500 hp steam boilers to hot water boilers, replacement on one 250 hp boiler with four new high efficiency condensing hot water boilers, replacement of the steam domestic water heater with high efficiency condensing water heaters, conversion of 45 air handler steam coils with hot water coils, removal of steam heat exchangers and condensate pumps, installation of new hot water circulating pumps and various other components and controls.

  3. Simultaneous Heating and Cooling System
    This project involves the installation of two new 250 ton heater/chillers, pumps, accessories and VFDs, (200) 300’ deep vertical, 400 ton geothermal bore field, electrical revisions and piping.

F Wing Health Professions Building

In September 2013 after major renovation, the F Wing Health Professions Building was opened for occupancy.  The 93,384 square foot space of this building meets the measures of sustainability for high performance planning, construction, and operation as established by the U.S. Green Building Council for Leadership in Energy & Environmental Design (LEED).  We are currently in the process of applying for LEED® Gold certification. The building is recognized in six key areas of human and environmental health including sustainable site development, water savings, energy efficiency, materials selection, indoor environmental quality and innovation in design.

The building includes energy efficient lighting, water conservation toilet rooms, occupancy sensors, utility metering, water bottle refill stations, green cleaning processes, and recycled materials collection. It features an energy recovery unit which captures heat from the exhaust air and returns it to the mechanical systems for reuse.

In the atrium, a living plant wall spans three stories and enhances indoor air ventilation by removing common air contaminants. A rainwater harvesting system uses captured and filtered rainwater to hydrate the living plant wall and to flush toilets. The site features stormwater detention, water-efficient landscaping that utilizes designs and plants suited to our local conditions.  The site offers alternative transportation by bus, bike, and ride-sharing and parking for energy efficient vehicles.

Much of the furniture and finishes including floor coverings, ceiling tiles, and doors are constructed of rapidly-renewable and recycled materials, advocate cradle-to-cradle concepts, and were regionally manufactured.

By conserving energy and natural resources and using materials that are less impactful to the environment, this building minimizes the emission of greenhouse gases and contributes to a healthier environment for the campus community.  Its energy efficient design lowers our campus operating costs by reducing the consumption of electricity, gas, and water.

Storm Water Management

Delta College has completed extensive landscape and storm water improvements over the recent past years. These include parking lots on the South, East, and West of the main building. In 2008, the South lot project utilized sustainable concepts to address improvements to the storm water drain system and the Klauss Drain as identified in the 2003 Campus Master Plan. It incorporated renovations and upgrades to the two deteriorating south parking areas which had not been repaved since originally constructed in the early 1970's. Even more significant were necessary upgrades to vehicular and pedestrian bridges providing access to the south parking area and the expansion of the east lot to provide improved access to campus buildings.

Three new bridge crossings were constructed over the Klauss Drain. The stream channel was widened and the sharp drain bends softened to increase the holding availability and alleviate flood conditions. The work completed in the drain created a more natural meandering watercourse to allow the growth of various aquatic organisms, promote water cleanliness, and cultivate the diversity of micro and macro invertebrates which will benefit from the improved ecosystem changes.

Upgrades to the East parking lot in 2013, West parking in 2015, as well as South parking, feature bioswales. Bioswales are landscaped areas designed to remove debris and pollutants from storm water runoff before it is released to the storm sewer or regional watershed. The East and South areas rely on detention ponds to serve as a storage area for storm water runoff from the adjacent bioswales.

All storm water management areas feature water efficient landscaping such as native groundcovers, deep-rooted plantings, and plants suited to our local conditions. They require less irrigation and a low/no mow maintenance which reduces mower fuel consumption and its pollutants.

Each of the parking lots use efficient LED lighting which are projected to save nearly 40,000 kWh of energy annually. It’s estimated that under regular operation, the new lamps will need only be replaced every 12-15 years compared to the 2-3 years of conventional fixtures, significantly reducing maintenance costs, as well.

Specific to East Parking, permeable pavement was installed. This is a parking lot base that allows for rain water and snow melt to move through the surface. It effectively traps dirt and debris, filtering their pollutants before they reach significant bodies of water.

Delta College supports the use of electric vehicles, as a means for commuting that reduces and/or eliminates pollution and lessens the college carbon footprint. Two Level 2 charging stations which can accommodate two vehicles each, were installed in West Campus.

j) Land owned by the institution, and include a determination of whether capacity exists for future development, additional acquisitions are needed to meet future demands, or surplus land can be conveyed for a different purpose.

Following is a list of property owned by Delta College. Sufficient capacity exists for further development. The College is evaluating additional acquisitions to meet future needs in specific areas of our district:

  1. Main Campus
    1961 Delta Road
    University Center, Michigan 48706
  1. Planetarium & Learning Center
    100 Center Avenue
    Bay City, Michigan 48708
  1. Midland Center
    1025 East Wheeler Street
    Midlan, Michigan 48642
  1. Delta College Sailing School
    303 Sunrise
    Bay City, Michigan 48706
  1. Delta College Gilford Transmitter
    2670 N. Quanicassee Road
    Reese, Michigan 48757

k) What portions of existing buildings, if any, are currently obligated to the State Building Authority and when these State Building Authority leases are set to expire.

All of our current main campus buildings except our Power House, Maintenance Building, T.V. Transmitter Buildings, and the Farmhouse were included in the property that was part of the bonds for our Science & Learning Technology Facility, our Campus Renovation II – Project A Projects and Health and Wellness – F-Wing Renovations project.  See attached campus maps.

The lease for the Science & Learning Technology Facility project is scheduled to expire on November 30, 2034.

The lease for the Campus Renovation II – Project A project is scheduled to expire on December 31, 2039.

The lease for the Health and Wellness – F-Wing Renovations project is scheduled to expire on July 31, 2050.

Campus Map Attachment 1 (PDF)
Campus Map Attachment 2 (PDF)