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Adult Development

PSY 235W

Adult Development

PSY 235W

Course Description

Prerequisites: Prerequisites: PSY 211W and PSY 223W both with grade of “C” or better.

Provides a comprehensive exploration of the physical, cognitive, and social/emotional development during emerging, early, middle and late adulthood. Explores the significance of adulthood in the total life span. Analyzes the impact of heredity, environment, and culture on adults’ development, as well as the impact adults have on others. (45-0)

Outcomes and Objectives

Evaluate major issues concerning adult development.

Objectives:

  • Discuss both change and continuity in adult behavior.
  • Describe the nature/nurture controversy.

Examine issues of development using the major theories of (adult) development.

Objectives:

  • Describe the major theories of (adult) development: psychodynamic, cognitive, ecological, social learning, behavioral, and biological.
  • Describe the similarities and differences between these theories.

Describe and evaluate the advantages and limitations of cross-sectional and longitudinal research.

Objectives:

  • Explain the differences between the two types of research.
  • Discuss reasons why a researcher would choose one type of research rather than the other.

Examine the impact of remaining single, homosexuality, parenthood, marriage, divorce, widowhood, grandparenting, retirement, and cohabitation.

Objectives:

  • Describe the benefits and challenges of each status.
  • Identify ways in which status impacts the individual.

Describe the challenges of middle adulthood.

Objectives:

  • Describe menopause and climacteric and how they impact the individual.
  • Discuss the empty nest syndrome and the mid-life crisis and how they affect a person.

Describe health challenges in adulthood.

Objectives:

  • Identify the typical physical and sensory changes that accompany aging, as well as ways of combating these problems.
  • Describe the problems of Alzheimer's disease, dementia, memory impairment, and suicide risk, as well as ways of combating these problems.

Examine the issues of death and dying.

Objectives:

  • Discuss ways of helping grieve the loss of one's own health and/or friends and family members.
  • Discuss options when choosing one's means of where--and potentially how to--die.

Perform writing tasks to promote learning of concepts.

Objectives:

  • Document attainment of skills learned.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of the subject.