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Lifespan Development

PSY 227W

Lifespan Development

PSY 227W

Course Description

Prerequisite: PSY 211W with grade of “C” or better. Provides a comprehensive exploration of physical, cognitive, and social/emotional development throughout the lifespan. Analyzes the impact of heredity, environment, and culture, while considering the developmental tasks and personal adjustment challenges associated with each stage of life. (45-0)

Outcomes and Objectives

Summarize the major changes associated with each stage of devleopment.

Objectives:

  • Describe the field of Developmental Psychology.
  • Examine the events surrounding conception, prenatal development, and birth.
  • Describe the physical, cognitive, social, and moral characteristics of the following stages of development: newborn, infancy, early childhood, middle childhood, adolescence, early adulthood, middle adulthood, and late adulthood.

Describe the major theoretical approaches and research methods used in lifespan development.

Objectives:

  • Describe and evaluate research strategies used in lifespan development (e.g., descriptive, correlational, experimental, twin studies, longitudinal, cross-sectional, cross-sequential).
  • Describe the major theoretical approaches used in discussion of lifespan development (e.g., Freud, Erikson, Piaget, Kohlberg, Vygotsky, Bronfenbrenner, Bandura, Information Processing).

Evaluate information related to lifespan development in a manner that is consistent with current thinking and research in the field.

Objectives:

  • Evaluate attachment theory.
  • Evaluate parenting styles and the impact of each style.
  • Explore special topics in infancy (e.g., prematurity, fetal alcohol syndrome, congenital disability).
  • Explore special topics in childhood (e.g., ADHD, learning disabilities, bullying).
  • Explore special topics in adolescence (e.g., suicide, self-injury, eating disorders).
  • Explore special topics in aging (e.g., strategies for successful aging, care of the elderly).
  • Explore special topics in death and dying (e.g., hospice care, euthanasia, death and grief).

Recognize the diversity of development across the lifespan both across individuals and across cultures.

Objectives:

  • Describe the interactions between genetic and environmental factors.
  • Describe the influence of the family, the peer group, and the school.
  • Explore the impact of culture.
  • Differentiate between normal variations in development and abnormal behavior.

Perform writing tasks to promote learning of concepts.

Objectives:

  • Apply the principles and theories of development through the completion of projects and written reports.
  • Reflect upon learning through in-class and out-of-class writing opportunities.