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Early African-American Literature

ENG 277W

Early African-American Literature

ENG 277W

Course Description

Prerequisite: READING LEVEL 3 and any approved College Composition I course with a minimum grade of C. Studies American history and trends that affected African-American writers from the oral tradition to the written works. Credit may be earned in ENG 277W or LIT 277W but not both. (45-0)

Outcomes and Objectives

Analyze literature in the subject area.

Objectives:

  • Interpret the meanings of literary works using various theoretical approaches.
  • Identify various literary genres.
  • Demonstrate analytical understanding through writing.
  • Demonstrate a mastery of literary devices such as plot, tone, character, setting, and theme.
  • Articulate an interpretative response to African American literature prior to the Harlem Renaissance and explain the premises and assumptions that underlie these interpretative responses.

Participate in writing to learn activities.

Objectives:

  • Perform writing tasks to promote learning.
  • Write effectively for a specific audience and purpose.
  • Demonstrate the learning of concepts through writing.
  • Write a literary analysis that includes a clear thesis statement and uses academic sources to support this thesis statement.

Demonstrate an understanding of the cultural and historical context for this body of literature.

Objectives:

  • Demonstrate an understanding of the lives of the authors and the society in which they lived.
  • Discuss the relevancy of literature to contemporary society.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of how issues of race, class and gender have influenced the African American literary sensibility.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of how the African American literary sensibility has influenced the American literary sensibility.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of how African American writers responded to major literary movements in American culture from the 18th century through the early 20th century.