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Trees and Shrubs Of Michigan

BIO 113

Trees and Shrubs Of Michigan

BIO 113

Course Description

Prerequisites: Prerequisites: READING LEVEL 2, WRITING LEVEL 2 AND MATH LEVEL 2.

Identification of the Michigan trees and shrubs indigenous to the Saginaw Valley. Methods used in this field course include use of the leaf, bark, twig, flower and silhouette. Historical and practical information presented as appropriate. (15-0)

Outcomes and Objectives

Participate in the process of science.

Objectives:

  • Make observations
  • Design, conduct experiments
  • Formulate and test hypothesis
  • Collect data
  • Analyze data
  • Draw conclusions
  • Report results
  • Analyze and revise

Work collaboratively with classmates and instructor.

Objectives:

  • Participate in field exercises with 1-3 classmates.
  • Share the workload in each field experience.
  • Share experience of acquiring, transporting, cleaning, and storing equipment used in class.
  • Share ideas and effectively dialogue with classmates.

Demonstrate the competent use of instruments and technology used in the field to analyze trees, shrubs and ecosystem symbiosis and synergy.

Objectives:

  • Use metric systems and typical devices to measure mass, length, volume and temperature.
  • Follow directions provided with various kinds of scientific equipment.
  • Use a pH meter, light meter, tree borer, compass, and triangulation devices.

Competently communicate about Michigan trees, shrubs and their biotic and abiotic interaction.

Objectives:

  • Read critically
  • Write effectively
  • Listen actively
  • Speak effectively
  • Be able to interpret graphs, charts
  • Compile a journal summarizing appropriate activities

Be able to demonstrate the ability to think critically.

Objectives:

  • Integrate concepts.
  • Solve problems.
  • Draw logical conclusions.
  • Carefully examine evidence.
  • Correlate relationships.
  • Distinguish between simple correlation and cause and effect.

Demonstrate competence in preparation of and participation in field activities.

Objectives:

  • Participate in field activities and use appropriate equipment to conduct field activities.
  • Select appropriate dress and equipment for overnight experience or single-day experience.
  • Demonstrate safe and appropriate behavior during sessions.
  • Use keys and resource books to identify and set perspective of natural history of organisms.
  • Measure and characterize individual species members and their environmental significance.
  • Report the results of outdoor studies conducted during sessions.

Describe trees, shrubs in relationship to one another and their non-living environment.

Objectives:

  • Identify biotic and abiotic factors in appropriate settings.
  • Describe the niche and habitat concept.
  • Differentiate between a community and an ecosystem.
  • List components of an ecosystem.
  • Describe and identify individual and groups of trees and shrubs.
  • Recognize symbiotic and synergistic relationships in ecosystems visited.
  • Explain natural history of key species.
  • Understand medicinal value of lay species.
  • Understand historical significance of key species.
  • Relate environmental factors to diversity, abundance and quality of species observed.

Describe how the biotic elements in the ecosystems change over time in Michigan.

Objectives:

  • Recognize primary and secondary succession.
  • Recognize the process of succession from pioneer species to climax species.
  • Describe the disclimax succession.
  • Identify and describe the trees and shrubs of the grassland, deciduous forest, coniferous forest, marsh, bog and swamp.
  • Recognize the physical features which will determine type of climax forest.
  • Describe the role of soil type, hydrology, and local physiographic factors.
  • Describe the structure of a plant community including canopy trees, understory trees, shrubs and herbaceous plants.