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Architectural History

ART 251W

Architectural History

ART 251W

Course Description

Prerequisite: READING LEVEL 3 and WRITING LEVEL 3. Examines the historical development of architecture as a major art form. Emphasizes this development in relation to man's knowledge of building techniques and available materials as affected by geographic, economic, political, and religious influences. (45-0)

Outcomes and Objectives

Draw informed relationships between works of architecture and the historical period and culture in which it was created.

Objectives:

  • Describe architecture in relation to the originating culture.
  • Identify aesthetic, political, technological, and spiritual values which influenced or are represented in works of architecture.
  • Articulate a recognition of and appreciation for cultural values inherent in works of architecture.

Recognize styles and identify specific works of architecture from a variety of the world's ancient cultures.

Objectives:

  • Identify specific examples of architecture by artist, historical period, style, and culture as appropriate.

Demonstrate knowledge of a basic vocabulary for the discussion of works of art.

Objectives:

  • Use, in writing and discussion, specific architectural terms such as form, function, symbolism, rustication, pilaster, corbel arch, etc.
  • Describe works of architecture correctly, using this vocabulary in historical and cultural contexts for specific works of architecture.

Demonstrate effective writing skills.

Objectives:

  • Write effective essays as a means of demonstrating their understanding of the concepts and knowledge from Outcomes I, II, and III.

Demonstrate critical thinking skills.

Objectives:

  • Evaluate previously unseen architecture in terms described in Outcomes I, II, III.
  • Propose a personal position based on their own values in relation to these buildings.
  • Advocate and defend personal choices and positions through informed and appropriate use of the values and vocabulary previously described.